Monday, April 21, 2014

Berwick-upon-Tweed’s Fascinating Food History

If you had lived in the Scottish Borders in the 1840s and had a modest income as most people did, your diet would have been mostly oatmeal and potatoes with the addition of milk (and in a few parishes cheese) and garden vegetables. Bread was occasionally used, but butcher-meat very rarely. In the Borders, the most common meat was pork (or bacon or ham), the labouring classes rarely saw beef or mutton, except for dead or diseased sheep, though I suspect many may have eaten fish or rabbit.

Our next meeting is this Sunday, 27th April, at 2.30pm in Coldingham Village Hall, Coldingham, TD14 5NL, when Derek Sharman will talk about Berwick-upon-Tweed’s fascinating food history. 

The Victorian period was a period of change and innovation in farming, fishing and the producing, processing and selling of food and drink.  It was also the heyday for Berwick’s trade in barley, herring and salmon. The town is full of reminders of its food-producing heritage - old salmon fishing shiels, ice-houses, herring yards, smokehouses, breweries, granaries and maltings. This talk offers fascinating glimpses into that time through a selection of extracts from local newspapers and photographs from the Berwick Record Office collection. 

I think you'll find this a very interesting talk whether you're interested in family history, local or social history.
I warmly invite you to attend the talk whether you are a member or not.

Doors open at 2pm; the meeting begins at 2.30pm. It’s free to come in.

We'll have a range of family history publications available to buy, and there’ll be light refreshments (donation expected) available after the talk.
If you have a problem with your family history, please discuss it (no charge) with one of our volunteers.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Free access to Irish Newspaper Archives - if you're quick !

According to Irish Genealogy News, there's free access to the Irish Newspaper Archives until 11am on Thursday 17th April.

A lot of people came from Ireland to work in the Borders, so if the Irish were in your ancestry (as they were in mine) or appear in your family stories, they might have been in the newspapers.

I've tried it out but haven't yet found anything relevant.
If you get stuck, there's a video tour when you login.

Login information needed:

User: freebie16
Password: freebie16

Thanks also to Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections where I first saw it.

Post a comment below, if you find anything interesting, please.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Free Access to Part of Ancestry between 18 April and 21 April

To celebrate Easter, Ancestry are offering free access to some of their collections from 00:00 on 18 April until 23:59 on 21 April.

You'll need to be registered to take advantage of the offer and be signed in when you search.

The collections are:

    1901 Scotland Census
    1901 Wales Census
    1911 Channel Islands Census
    1911 Channel Islands Census Summary Books
    1911 England Census
    1911 England Census Summary Books
    1911 Isle of Man Census
    1911 Isle of Man Census Summary Books
    1911 Wales Census Updated!
    1911 Wales Census Summary Books Free Index
    British Army World War I Medal Rolls Index Cards, 1914-1920
    British Army World War I Pension Records 1914-1920
    British Army World War I Service Records, 1914-1920
    England & Wales, Birth Index, 1916-2005
    England & Wales, Death Index, 1916-2007
    England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915 Free Index
    England & Wales, FreeBMD Death Index, 1837-1915 Free Index
    England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915 Free Index
    England & Wales, Marriage Index, 1916-2005
    England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

Enjoy your free search on Ancestry !

Thursday, April 10, 2014

More Gravestone Recording at Peebles St Andrews Cemetery

This Saturday (12 April) and next Saturday (19 April), we’ll be at St Andrews Cemetery, Peebles, Peeblesshire  from 10am to 4pm to record gravestone inscriptions and take photos.

If you have not been to a previous transcribing session - don't worry, you will be made very welcome and full training will be given.
Bring along a notebook and pen/pencil, a kneeling pad, a light brush and some chalk (optional).
Most people coming for the whole day bring along a picnic, and a bottle of water; deciphering faded and weathered inscriptions can be thirsty work.
If preferred, the Neidpath Inn is a few minutes walk back towards the town and does bar lunches. Beyond the inn, Forsyth, the baker's has a shop; there's a Coop store just beyond that. If you are looking for something special - just round the corner from Ramblers is Cocoa Black on the bridge - award winning chocolatier with cakes and sandwiches as well.

It's wonderful if you can manage the whole day, but if that's too long for you, no problems at all - all assistance on the day is very welcome.
Although you can just turn up, it would be more helpful if you could let Gwen know in advance. Her phone number is 01896  830564. Letting her know is a wise precaution; in the event of adverse weather, the recording may be curtailed or cancelled.

We’re looking forward to catching up with you and meeting some new faces.

Getting there: Go out of Peebles on the Glasgow Road (also known as Old Town Road/Neidpath Road/A72) and the cemetery is on the right hand side opposite the entrance to the Park/medical centre. It is about a 5 minute walk from the end of the High Street. Map.

Monday, April 7, 2014

Old Gala House






Another season gets under way and our Archive and Research Room re-opens this Thursday.

We had hoped that we might see the opening at our new premises in Overhaugh Street in Galashiels but the very substantial alterations which we have been carrying out there are still not quite complete. Not though all that far away – WATCH THIS SPACE.

According we shall be re-opening at our usual premises at Old Gala House (above).

The Research Room will be open every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and also on Tuesdays and Fridays by appointment. While strictly speaking no appointment is necessary on Thursdays, because if the size of the room (which is why we are moving) this is advised.

To make an appointment contact our Archive Convenor, Mary Thompson - on our Home Page go to ‘Contracts’, scroll down and under ‘Type of Contract’ select ‘Archive Appointment  Request’

During the removal it is inevitable that there will be some disruption and probably several days when we shall not be open at all – full details however in due course.

Meantime though we do trust we shall continue to be able to offer a service to members and others with their researches.

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Stow Monumental Inscriptions




We are pleased to announce the publication on CD of the long awaited Stow Monumental Inscriptions.

The CD contains transcriptions of the gravestone inscriptions and photographs of all the stones, 671 in total in both the old churchyard of St. Mary's of Wedale as well as the new cemetery. All are indexed by surname,  first name and date of death.

Additionally there is included in the publication a list of the Parishioners of Stow in 1530, the 1694 Hearth Tax, the 1798 Militia List, the 1801 population list (1380 individuals) and an 1830 list of families with burial plots in the Old Churchyard; also details of War Memorials, Rolls of Honour and ministers down the ages. 

There are also some fine photographs of the Church and Churchyard including an early etching and quite a bit of general historical background.

An absolute must especially for anyone with a connection to the Parish or just an interest in local history.

The price is £10 plus postage. To order contact our Sales Convenor, Mary Thomson (go to Contacts and scroll down and complete 'Order for Publications')

The Society is very indebted to all who assisted over the years including the late Nancy McLaughlan, Fay Mackay, Gwen Stein and Elma Fleming.

There are more than 450 different surnames included in the inscriptions on the gravestones, and they are:
 Adam, Adams, Adamson, Addison, Affleck, Agan, Ainslie, Aitchison, Aitken, Allan, Alston, Amos, Anderson, Angus, Archibald, Arkwright, Armstrong, Backworth, Baillie, Bain, Balfour, Balmer, Barker, Barnet, Barr, Bartley, Bathgate, Beattie, Begbie, Bell, Bennet, Bennett, Bentley, Beresford, Billam, Bird, Bishop, Black, Blackie, Blaikie, Blair, Bleckie, Boog-scott, Boyd, Bradley, Braid, Brockie, Brodie, Broomfield, Brotherston, Brotherstone, Brown, Brownlee, Brunton, Bryce, Brydon, Burrell, Cairns, Calderwood, Cameron, Cannon, Capp, Carruthers, Carter, Charters, Chase, Chisholm, Clapperton, Clark, Cockburn, Colmer, Colston, Conkie, Cook, Cooke, Copeland, Cormack, Cossar, Cowe, Craig, Craise, Cran, Cranston, Crawford, Crosby, Crozier, Currie, Dagg, Dalgleish, Dalgliesh, Dalziel, Darling, Davidson, Deane, Denholm, Dick, Dickie, Dickson, Dobson, Dodd, Dods, Doig, Donaldson, Doogan, Dornan, Douglas, Dougle, Duff, Duffes, Dun, Duncan, Duncanson, Dykes, Easton, Eckford, Ede, Edgely, Elder, Elliot, Ellis, Fair, Fairbairn, Fairgrieve, Ferguson, Finch, Finnigan, Fleming, Flinn, Ford, Forsyth, Fortune, Fowler, Fraser, Frier, Fyffe, Gamble, Garrett, Garvie, Gauld, Geddes, Gentles, Gerrard, Giblett, Gibson, Gillies, Gilroy, Gladstone, Glenney, Glover, Goodfellow, Goodwin, Graham, Grant, Gray, Greenfield, Greenlaw, Greenshields, Gresson, Guthrie, Haig, Haliburton, Hall, Halliday, Hannah, Hardie, Harper, Harvey, Hastie, Hay, Hayes, Henderson, Hendrie, Hendry, Henry, Herbert, Heriot, Herkes, Hermiston, Hewitson, Hill, Hilton, Hislop, Hog, Hogan, Hogarth, Hogg, Hope, Horsburgh, Hossack, Houliston, Howden, Howey, Howieson, Hume, Hunt, Hunter, Hurst, Hush, Hutchison, Hyslop, Inglis, Ireland, Irvine, Irving, Jack, Jackson, Jaffray, Jamieson, Jeffrey, Johnston, Johnstone, Joyce, Jude, Kay, Keddie, Kellett, Kellie, Kelly, Keppie, Kerr, Kidston, King, Kirkpatrick, Knight, Knox, Laidlaw, Lamb, Lambert, Lappin, Lauder, Law, Lawson, Leadbetter, Lee, Lees, Leitch, Leithead, Lewis, Liddle, Lidgate, Lindsay, Linton, Lister, Little, Lloyd, Lofthouse, Logan, Lothian, Loue, Lough, Lowe, Lumsden, Lunn, Lyall, Macdonald, Mackay, Macmillan, Macvicar, Magee, Mair, Mallen, Malley, Malloy, Malpas, Mann, Mare, Marr, Marshall, Martin, Mather, Mathers, Matheson, Mavin, Mcadam, Mcarthur, Mcbeath, Mccairney, Mccall, Mccartney, Mccombie, Mcdonald, Mcginn, Mcglasson, Mcintosh, Mcintyre, Mciver, Mclauchlan, Mclaughlan, Mclaughlin, Mclean, Mclennan, Mcleod, Mclintock, Mcmurchie, Mcnab, Mcquat, Mein, Melrose, Menzies, Mercer, Messer, Metcalf, Middlemas, Middlemass, Middleton, Miles, Millar, Miller, Mills, Milne, Milroy, Minins, Minto, Mitchelhill, Mitchell, Moffat, Monro, Muir, Mullins, Muncaster, Munro, Murray, Myles, Nash, Neil, Neill, Nichol, Nisbet, Oliver, Ormiston, Ovens, Pate, Paterson, Paton, Patterson, Paxton, Pew, Picton-phillipps, Pittendrich, Porteous, Preston, Pretsell, Pringle, Proven, Pryde, Purdie, Purves, Purvis, Rae, Raeburn, Ralston, Ramage, Ramsay, Rathie, Redpath, Reid, Rennie, Renwick, Riach, Richardson, Riddell, Ritchie, Robertson, Rodger, Rodgers, Ross, Rouse, Russel, Russell, Rutherfoord, Rutherford, Sanderson, Sandilands, Saunders, Scott, Shaw, Shell, Shepherd, Shiels, Shillinglaw, Shortreed, Simpson, Sked, Slater, Smail, Smart, Smeal, Smellie, Smibbert, Smibert, Smith, Sommerville, Spence, Sprott, Stavert, Steele, Stein, Stenhouse, Stephen, Stevenson, Stewart, Stirling, Stoddart, Storie, Stuart, Swanston, Swinton, Sword, Symons, Tait, Taylor, Telfer, Tennant, Thin, Thompson, Thomson, Thorburn, Tillie, Tinlin, Torrie, Tough, Trotter, Turnbull, Turner, Tweedie, Utterson, Waddell, Wadderston, Waldie, Walker, Walkinshaw, Wallace, Ward, Wardrop, Warner, Watherston, Watson, Watt, Waugh, Webster, Wedderburn, Weir, Welch, Welsh, Wetherston, Whellans, White, Whitehead, Whitson, Whittle, Wight, Wilkie, Wilkinson, Willens, William, Williamson, Wilson, Winter, Witherspoon, Wood, Woolley, Workman, Wylie, Wyllie, Yellowlees, Young, Yule.